Applications for USDA REAP energy audit, renewable energy development assistance grants due January 31

The Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) recently opened its “Energy Audit and Renewable Energy Development Assistance” grants (EA & REDA), to support rural small businesses and agricultural producers in the evaluation, implementation, and utilization of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies.

EA & REDA funds can support energy audits, renewable energy technical assistance, and renewable energy site assessments. Eligible projects costs may include salaries related to an EA or REDA project; travel expenses directly related to conducting EA or REDA projects; office supplies; and administrative expenses, which include, but are not limited to, utilities, office space, and operation expenses of office and other project-related equipment.

Applicants must submit separate applications, limited to one EA project and one REDA project per fiscal year. The maximum aggregate amount of an EA & REDA grant per applicant in a Federal fiscal year is $100,000.

Applications for EA & REDA funds are due to REAP by January 31Click here to learn more and to apply for REAP financial assistance. Click here to find the REAP point of contact for your Tennessee region.

USDA’s Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) is seeking applications

The USDA’s Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) provides loan financing and grant funding to agricultural producers and rural small businesses for renewable energy systems and energy efficiency improvements. Currently, the USDA is seeking applications for Fiscal Year 2020

The purpose of the program is to create energy independence through increasing access to capital for renewable energy projects and decreasing the demand for energy through energy efficient initiatives. Funds may be used to buy, install, and install renewable energy systems, including solar, biomass, hydrogen, wind, geothermal, and more. Other possible uses include energy efficiency improvements for HVAC systems, insulation, lighting, doors and windows, cooling units, and more. Applications for grants and/or loans have varying deadlines: 

  • Grants and/or Loans of $20,000 or Less: Applications due October 31, 2019 or March 31, 2020
  • Unrestricted Grants and/or Loans: Applications due March 31, 2020
  • Energy Audit and Renewable Energy Development Assistance Grants: Applications due January 31, 2020
  • Guaranteed Loans: Applications are accepted on a continuous cycle

The agency encourages all applicants to consider projects that offer measurable results in rural communities, helping them build robust, sustainable economics through effective and strategic investments in partnerships, infrastructure and innovation. According to the USDA, these strategies may include:

  • Achieving e-Connectivity for Rural America
  • Developing the Rural Economy
  • Harnessing Technological Innovation
  • Supporting a Rural Workforce
  • Improving Quality of Life 

Follow this link to learn more about REAP or apply for financial assistance. Click here to find the REAP point of contact for your region in Tennessee. 

USDA’s Rural Energy for America Program applications due April 1

The Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) provides loan financing and grant funding to agricultural producers and rural small businesses for renewable energy systems and energy efficiency improvements. This program helps improve American energy independence by both increasing the private sector supply of renewable energy and decreasing the demand for energy through energy efficiency improvements. Over time, these investments can also help lower energy costs for small businesses and agricultural producers. Funding for Fiscal Year 2019 is available in a variety of forms, each under its own application process and timeline:
  • Grants and/or Loans of $20,000 or less: Applications are due April 1.
  • Unrestricted Grants and/or Loans: Applications are due April 1.
  • Guaranteed Loan: Applications are accepted on a continuous cycle.
Funds may be used for renewable energy systems, such as biomass (biodiesel and ethanol, anaerobic digesters, and solid fuels); geothermal for electric generation or direct use; hydropower below 30 MW; hydrogen; small and large wind generation; small and large solar generation; and ocean (tidal, current, thermal) generation. Funds may also be used for the purchase, installation, and construction of energy efficiency improvements, such as high efficiency heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems (HVAC); insulation; lighting; cooling or refrigeration units; doors and windows; electric, solar, or gravity pumps for sprinkler pivots; switching from a diesel to electric irrigation motor; and replacement of energy-inefficient equipment. 
Click here to learn more and to apply for REAP financial assistance. Click here to find the REAP point of contact for your Tennessee region.

Download Today: Federal Financing Programs for Clean Energy

The Department of Energy has released a free resource guide to U.S. programs that support clean energy projects. The Federal Financing Programs for Clean Energy features ten agencies, including summaries and case studies, that can benefit private sector partners in finding capital for energy efficiency and clean energy projects.

Screen Shot 2016-07-06 at 10.37.23 PMFor every program listed, the guide identifies additional contact information to answer questions and provide additional direction.

Now in its third edition, the guide includes financing programs for both domestic and international projects. The guide includes programs from the U.S. Departments of Agriculture, Energy, Housing and Urban Development, State, Transportation and Treasury, along with the Environmental Protection Agency, Overseas Private Investment Corporation, and the Small Business Administration.

The programs listed within the guide are resources that can support clean energy deployment, and in turn lead to new investment, job creation, and additional benefits that can invigorate communities.

Business owners, homeowners, investors, policymakers, and others can use this guide as a “Yellow Pages” to federal programs. In some situations, the financing programs listed are specifically designed to support energy-related projects. In other cases, however, energy efficiency and clean energy are among many qualifying purposes for the particular financing program.

This guide is a companion to the Database for State Incentives for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (DSIRE), which provides state-specific information on incentives and policies to support clean energy and energy efficiency in the United States. More information on DSIRE is available at http://www.dsireusa.org/.

Additional information is available through the U.S. Department of Energy and its Clean Energy Investment Center (CEIC). More information on the DOE financing programs and the CEIC is available at www.energy.gov/finance.

To download the guide, click here.