There’s still time to apply for the Tennessee Natural Gas and Propane Vehicle Grant Program

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) is reminding you to apply for the Tennessee Natural Gas and Propane Vehicle Grant Program.

The program will assist public, non-profit, and private Tennessee-based fleets with the investment in and purchase of natural gas or propane-powered medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. The program, managed by TAEBC member TDEC, is limited to one application per grantee, per location.

The announcement comes as October is National Energy Awareness month, which serves to underscore how critical energy is to our prosperity and security.

In Tennessee, the transportation sector accounts for about 30 percent of all energy consumed. By reducing transportation related end-use energy consumption, we can improve our economy and energy security while also reducing emissions.

Funding:

  • $2,500,000 is available under this competitive funding opportunity.
  • Each grant will provide up to 50% of the incremental purchase cost of eligible vehicles, with a maximum grant of $25,000 for each eligible vehicle.
  • The maximum amount that may be awarded to a grantee shall not exceed $250,000.

Eligibility:

  • A project must propose to receive funding for a minimum of three vehicles.
  • Eligible vehicles must be purchased new, from an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) or OEM-authorized dealer. The vehicles purchased must be fully equipped by the manufacturer or by a third party at the direction of the manufacturer to operate on an alternative fuel prior to the initial purchase and registration of the vehicle.
  • Vehicles must be registered within the State of Tennessee, unless the vehicle is to receive International Registration Plan (IRP) apportioned registration. In the case of the latter, the entity applying for a grant must submit a letter, certifying the percentage of time that the vehicle is expected to operate within the State of Tennessee.
  • Eligible vehicles include dedicated compressed natural gas vehicles, dedicated liquefied natural gas vehicles, and dedicated propane-powered vehicles.
  • Vehicles must be classified as “medium-duty” or “heavy-duty,” and must therefore have a gross vehicle weight rating of at least 14,000 pounds. Examples of “medium-duty” vehicles that would be considered eligible are shuttle buses, delivery trucks, and some bucket trucks. Examples of “heavy-duty” vehicles that would be considered eligible are school buses, tractor trailers, and waste collection vehicles.
  • Applicants must intend to maintain operations in Tennessee for a minimum of six years.

Deadline:

Applications must be received by 8:00 pm CST on December 16, 2016. Acceptable delivery methods include: mail, express delivery service, hand delivery, or email. Awards are expected to be announced by January 16, 2017, and the expected timeframe for award negotiations will be March 2017.

Digital copies should be emailed to: TDEC.OEP@tn.gov.

Hard copies should be mailed to:

Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation
The Office of Energy Programs – Tennessee Natural Gas and Propane Vehicle Grant Program
C/o Alexa Voytek
William R. Snodgrass Tennessee Tower
312 Rosa L. Parks Avenue, 2nd Floor
Nashville, TN 37243

Application Documents:

Tennessee Natural Gas and Propane Vehicle Grant Program Application Manual
Tennessee Natural Gas and Propane Vehicle Grant Program Application (CN-1495)

If you have questions, please contact Alexa Voytek at alexa.voytek@tn.gov or 615-532-0238.

Tennessee Environment Commissioner Martineau talks power plan’s jurisdictional challenges

Check out this E&E TV’s OnPoint segment, featuring Bob Martineau, president of the Environmental Council of the States and a commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation.

What jurisdictional challenges exist within states between air agencies and public utility commissions in determining how best to comply with U.S. EPA’s Clean Power Plan? Martineau explains how states are working behind the scenes to figure out next steps on the plan.

Click on the photo to be redirected to watch the video on E&E TV’s website.

Tennessee Environment Commissioner Martineau talks power plan's jurisdictional challenges

Tennessee Environment Commissioner Martineau talks power plan’s jurisdictional challenges

Guest Blog: TAEBC board president Tom Ballard answers, “What is TAEBC?”

Tom Ballard

Tom Ballard

By Tom Ballard, Director of Innovation and Entrepreneurial Initiatives, Pershing Yoakley & Associates, and President of the Board of Directors, Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council

The name of our organization – Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council – is a mouthful, and our acronym – TAEBC – does not roll off the tongue easily.

Nevertheless, no one would question the important role that this new, statewide not-for-profit organization plays in advancing the interests of a burgeoning and important contributor to the Volunteer State’s economy.

From Renewable Algal Energy in Johnson City to the Memphis Bioworks Foundation about 550 miles to the west, Tennessee is home to a vast array of established commercial entities, research organizations, and start-ups focused on technologies that contribute to our nation’s energy independence.

TAEBC takes a broad definitional view of the term “advanced energy.” As such, we are pleased to include as members and partners global players like Alstom (nuclear energy) and Schneider Electric (energy management), technology start-ups like Silicon Ranch Corporation (solar) and Top Five Corporation (composites), top research organizations like Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and energy consulting firms like Strata-G.

As Tennessee’s only organization focused solely on companies in the advanced energy space, TAEBC has established a strong track record in its formative two years.

  • We worked with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation and Pathway Lending to produce Tennessee’s Advanced Energy Asset Inventory, the first document of its kind dedicated to promoting the use of advanced energy technologies and assisting the development of Tennessee businesses in the emerging advanced energy sector.
  • We held three listening sessions – one each in Chattanooga, Knoxville and LaVergne – that drew more than 150 participants. During two of these sessions, we facilitated vibrant feedback sessions with top administrators from the U.S. Department of Energy.
  • We have partnered with the Energy Foundation to capitalize on that organization’s strong network and draw on its history of “best practices.”

In the months ahead, we will be hosting additional listening sessions, including West Tennessee, as we focus on understanding how to best serve this important industry sector.

You don’t have to be directly in advanced energy to be a member of TAEBC; certainly my employer is not. PYA does believe that technology advancements are critical to our state’s economy. If you share similar views, I invite you to join our organization and become an advanced energy evangelist. It’s as simple as clicking here.

Pershing Yoakley & Associates is the nation’s 10th largest privately held healthcare consulting company. Headquartered in Knoxville, PYA also has offices in Atlanta, Kansas City, Nashville, and Tampa. Tom Ballard is Director of Innovation and Entrepreneurial Initiatives for PYA and also Chief Operating Officer of PYA Analytics, LLC. The author has retired twice – from the University of Tennessee as Vice President for Public and Governmental Relations and from Oak Ridge National Laboratory as Director of Partnerships.