TAEBC’s 2020 Opportunities in Energy event emphasizes importance of transportation electrification and advanced energy efforts

The Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council hosted its annual Opportunities in Energy event virtually this week. The event featured TNECD Commissioner Bob Rolfe, a panel discussion about making Tennessee the destination for the electric vehicle supply chain, and preview of the upcoming Advanced Energy Economic Impact Report.

TAEBC Executive Director Cortney Piper kicked off the festivities by providing an overview of TAEBC’s mission and accomplishments in 2020. She spoke about challenges the state faced due to the COVID-19 pandemic and how Tennessee is uniquely positioned to capitalize on transportation electrification to help with economic recovery efforts 

“Transportation electrification and advanced energy could and should be used as job creation and economic development opportunities to help us rise out of our current crisis,” she said.

Commissioner Rolfe spoke about the importance of recruiting original equipment manufacturers to the Tennessee region, Tennessee’s automotive accomplishments, and the Drive Electric Tennessee initiative. He emphasized that the state is committed to becoming an electric vehicle transportation leader in the southeast.

After his presentation, Commissioner Rolfe was joined by John Hopkins, CEO of IACMI; Mike Swords, Vice President of Government Affairs and International Relations at the Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator; and moderator Tom Rogers, President and CEO of the UT Research Park at Cherokee Farm, for a panel session, “Tennessee’s EVolution: Making the state a destination for the electric vehicle supply chain.” 

Panelists spoke about the importance of electrification efforts, areas of opportunity, and important steps the state can take to accelerate its goal to be the top state in the country for electric vehicle manufacturing. Answering a question about how Tennessee can reach this goal, Commissioner Rolfe said, “The short answer is to recruit, recruit, and recruit.” 

“When we are recruiting, we want to showcase what Tennessee’s great strengths are,” he continued. These strengths include low business taxes, a high quality of living, affordable housing, and being considered one of the most “business friendly states” in the country. 

During the discussion, Swords spoke about a $150 billion federal stimulus proposal by the Transportation Electrification Partnership and LACI. TAEBC signed on to this proposal in July. Swords complimented Tennessee on its investment in transportation electrification. 

“It seems like there really is an aggressive push to achieve some of these big strategic goals for the state and it sounds like you are being quite successful so far,” said Swords. 

Afterward, Piper moderated a panel discussion about the 2021 Advanced Energy Economic Impact Report with Matt Murray, Director of Howard H. Baker Jr. Center; Amy Henry, Director, Transformative Innovation at the Tennessee Valley Authority; and Marc Gibson, Associate Vice Chancellor of Research at University of Tennessee. 

Murray started with an overview of the 2018 Tennessee Advanced Energy Economic Impact Report and discussed the process for creating it. Speaking about the 2018 report, Murray said the advanced energy economy has been “remarkable in terms of its economic performance.”

“The advanced energy sector in Tennessee is growing at a much more rapid pace than other segments of the economy and at a faster rate than the economy as a whole,” said Murray. According to the 2018 report, employment in the sector grew by 10.3 percent, a rate higher than the state’s overall growth rate of 8.3 percent, since 2013. 

Panelists discussed the importance of this data and how the report can help further advanced energy opportunities in the state. Answering a question about how vital institutions such as UT and TVA can use this data, Gibson explained, “This data is critical for us. We look at it holistically.” 

“I think if we can create that ecosystem and develop something that is statewide, we can make something that is very attractive for industry and others to look at the state of Tennessee as a landing spot,” said Gibson. “We want to be right in the middle of that. I think we have a responsibility to the state and really the region to do that.” 

Missed or loved the event? Watch the recording here and TNECD’s “Tennessee’s Electric Vehicle Evolution” video here.

Reflecting on TAEBC’s 2015 Achievements & the Year Ahead

With a new year well underway, it’s time for the Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council (TAEBC) to take inventory of 2015’s successes while charting a course for 2016.

TAEBC has grown to become a leading voice for our advanced energy economy, championing both the state and national opportunities to capture our more than fair share of the $1.3 trillion global advanced energy market.

Screen Shot 2016-01-05 at 3.54.53 PMFrom hosting Assistant Secretary David Danielson and Deputy Assistant Secretary Reuben Sarkar to an invitation to the White House and releasing the state’s first Tennessee Advanced Energy Economic Impact Report, 2015 proved to be a year in which the TAEBC voice was heard clearly on a state, regional and national level.

In anticipation of our annual membership meeting in Nashville, TAEBC shares our top 10 accomplishments from 2015.

TAEBC Top 10 Year in Review

  1. Tennessee Advanced Energy Economic Impact Report, the first document of its kind that defines the scope and scale of the state’s advanced energy sector and quantifies its economic impact. The report received statewide media coverage and recognition of advanced energy as an economic driver for Tennessee and a source of high quality jobs.
  2. U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary David Danielson Listening Session in Chattanooga, creating an opportunity for members to provide input on how DOE can continue to impact our economy.
  3. White House Forum on Connecting Regional Innovation Ecosystems to Federal and National Labs, attended by TAEBC President Tom Ballard with the purpose to ensure that federal labs continue to do more for regional economies.
  4. Tennessee Valley Authority’s Integrated Resource Plan (IRP), which looks at how TVA will meet energy needs over the next 20 years. A group of our members formed a small sub-committee and worked together to draft and submit comments relevant to our mission— advanced energy as an economic development strategy.
  5. TVA’s newly formed stakeholder group, Distributed Generation – Information Exchange. TAEBC was selected to serve on this stakeholder group, sharing industry expertise to inform TVA’s distributed generation policies.
  6. American Energy and Manufacturing Competitiveness Summit & Annual visit to Washington D.C. TAEBC delegates met with representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy and Senator Lamar Alexander and Congressman Chuck Fleischmann.
  7. “Opportunities in Energy” with U.S. Department of Energy Deputy Assistant Secretary for Transportation Reuben Sarkarfeaturing panel discussions on advancements in the automotive industry, advanced energy job growth, and power generation.
  8. DOE Director of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and minority business owners. TAEBC presented to this group, showcasing how advanced energy can be used as an economic development tool.
  9. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative’s (CEMI) Southeast Regional Summit, hosted by DOE. TAEBC spoke to manufacturers, innovators, and federal and regional resources about our unique approach to advanced energy as an economic development strategy.
  10. Welcome new members: Schneider Electric, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Windrow Phillips Group, Dr. Bill Carswell, Hitachi, One Scientific, Trane, Shoals Technologies Group, Bradley Arant Boult Cummings, LLP, Cherokee Farm, Dadeni Solar, LLC, Alstom (Charter Member), Nazzy Hashemian, and Balfour Beatty Investments.

Without a strong membership, TAEBC could not be the successful organization it is today. An organization with a powerful mission of fostering the growth of Tennessee’s advanced energy technologies, companies and jobs, helping the state gain its fair share of the global $1.3 trillion advanced energy market.

Save the date for the next membership opportunity, Wednesday, February 10th in Nashville, and help plan for a successful 2016.

 

 

TAEBC delegates visit D.C.

Members of the Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council enjoyed a productive visit to Washington D.C. this week. Delegates attended the American Energy and Manufacturing Competitiveness Summit, where Tennessee took center stage. Assistant Secretary Danielson announced two efforts— a national laboratory-industry collaboration pilot and a competitive solicitation to leverage national labs’ high-performance computing capabilities—to strengthen U.S. clean energy manufacturing competitiveness. TAEBC Charter member Oak Ridge National Lab is involved in both announcements.

TAEBC also met with representatives from the Appalachian Regional Commission and the Department of Energy. Finally, we stopped by Senator Alexander and Congressman Fleischmann’s office to brief them on the Tennessee Advanced Energy Economic Impact Report. More information about our trip coming soon!

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TN Advanced Energy Economic Impact Report: Snapshot of media coverage

On June 17, the Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council released the Tennessee Advanced Energy Economic Impact Report, the first document of its kind that defines the scope and scale of Tennessee’s advanced energy sector and quantifies its economic impact.

The report received statewide media coverage and recognition of advanced energy as an economic driver for Tennessee and a source of high quality jobs. It was distributed to more than 200 local, state and national economic development stakeholders.

Here’s a snapshot of the media coverage from the report release, with links to the full stories. Enjoy!

Tennessee could be a major player in $200B advanced energy economy (Knoxville News Sentinel)
“Tennessee is poised to take a significant chunk of the nation’s $200 billion advanced energy sector according to a new report from the Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council. The state’s advanced energy sector employs nearly 325,000 individuals…and the jobs pay well above the state average.”

Advanced energy industry grows in Tennessee (Chattanooga Times Free Press)
“Much of the growth in Tennessee is being driven by the automotive industry, which is working to reach a fleet average mileage standard of 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025.”

Report: Tennessee leader in ‘advanced energy’ (The Tennessean)
“’We see advanced energy as an economic driver, especially in rural areas,’ said Steve Bares, president and executive director of Memphis Bioworks Foundation.”

New report tracks Tennessee’s economic impact in ‘advanced energy’ sector (Kingsport Times-News)
“Advanced energy provides a home for Tennessee’s emerging workforce as the state attempts to get 55 percent of Tennesseans equipped with a college degree or certificate by 2025.”

Study: Advanced energy business contributes $33.4 billion to state GDP (Memphis Business Journal)
“Schneider Electric’s Jim Plourde said compiling the information was important for increasing visibility, highlighting Tennessee as a leader in the field, showcasing opportunities to an emerging workforce and driving the economy.”

Budding advanced energy sector grows in Tennessee (Nooga.com)
“The [advanced energy] industry provides opportunities for entrepreneurs. A developing sector means ripe opportunities for new ideas and businesses.”

TAEBC releases first-ever look at state’s advanced energy sector (Teknovation.biz)
“Advanced energy is a lucrative growth sector and a source of high quality jobs in the Volunteer State, according to a new report from the Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council (TAEBC).”

Schneider Electric among state leaders in advanced energy sector (Daily News Journal)
“’National studies show rapid growth that outpaces the rest of the economy,’ said Matt Murray, with the Howard Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy, which produced the report. He added it also found employment growth in the sector was more robust than any other sector from 2012 to 2013.”