Gary Rawlings joins ORNL’s Innovation Crossroads team

(Originally published: Teknovation.biz)

(If you’re interested in joining the Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council as a mentor, click here.)

A well-known player in two of the Launch Tennessee-supported mentor networks has an additional assignment as of today.

Gary Rawlings begins a part-time role as a Technology Consultant working with Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) “Innovation Crossroads” start-ups.

“We’ve known Gary for several years and have always been impressed with his knowledge and experience in both the corporate and start-up realms,” says Tom Rogers, ORNL’s Director of Industrial Partnerships and Economic Development. “As we’ve grown ‘Innovation Crossroads’ to eight companies and have opened applications for six more, he’ll be a great addition to our team.”

Rawlings and his wife moved to Murfreesboro in early 2015 to be closer to two of their three children who live there. Prior to that, he had spent his weeks commuting seven hours each way from their home in Greensboro, NC to Columbus, OH where Rawlings served for six years as Vice President for Commercialization at TechColumbus, the non-profit now known as Rev1 Ventures. That work followed a more than three-decade corporate career that included nearly 24 years with Monsanto.

The Houston TX native is a mentor in programs operated by the Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council’s and Life Science Tennessee with support from Launch Tennessee. Rawlings also serves as Entrepreneur-in-Residence for Cumberland Emerging Technologies in Nashville.

State’s advanced energy sector generates $40B in GDP

(Originally published: The Nashville Post)

The 2018 Tennessee Advanced Energy Economic Impact Report shows that the advanced energy sector in Tennessee outperforms the state’s overall economy, employing nearing 360,000 Tennesseans in more than 18,000 businesses that contribute almost $40 billion to the state’s GDP.

Recently released, the report was undertaken by the Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council (TAEBC), a statewide organization that champions advanced energy as an economic development and job creation strategy.

The 2018 report builds on data first analyzed by TAEBC’s 2015 Economic Impact Report, the inaugural study on the impact of the advanced energy sector in Tennessee.

“As the advanced energy economy continues to skyrocket, it is more critical than ever for Tennessee to grow its share of this $1.4 trillion global market,” said Matt Kisber, president and CEO of Silicon Ranch Corp. and TAEBC president. “Advanced energy … further enhances the state’s economic development position and attracts companies to locate and expand in-state.”

Key findings from the 2018 report include:

The advanced energy industry employs 358,360 Tennesseans and supports 18,170 businesses. It accounts for nearly 14 percent of total state employment. Workers in the state’s advanced energy sector earn an average wage of $59,665, significantly higher than the state’s economy-wide average of $44,317.

Read more here.

ORNL, UT technologies included in latest “R&D 100 Awards” finalists

(Originally published on Teknovation.biz)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Tennessee (UT) are among finalists that R&D Magazine has just announced for its annual “R&D 100 Awards.”

At times described as the equivalent of the Academy Awards, the recognition, now in its 56th year, have long been considered the most globally prestigious recognition of invention and innovation. The awards recognize 100 of the top innovations across five categories: analytical/test, IT/electrical, mechanical devices/materials, process/prototyping, and software/services.

The finalists were selected by an independent panel of more than 50 judges representing R&D leaders in a variety of fields.

ORNL was named as the primary or sole developer on six of the recognized technologies and was a co-developer on two more including something named the “Mobile Universal Grid Analyzer” where UT was the primary developer.

Read more here.

Advanced energy sector soars

(Originally published: The Nashville Ledger)

Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council states the advanced energy sector is so strong in Tennessee that it outperforms the state’s overall economy, employing nearing 360,000 Tennesseans in more than 18,000 businesses that contribute almost $40 billion to the state’s gross domestic product.

The Council, a Knoxville-based non-profit trade group made of companies in the sector, promotes advanced energy as a jobs creator and economic development strategy in the state.

Examples of advanced energy fields include any technology that makes energy for transportation cleaner, safer, more secure and more efficient. Examples include wind, solar, and new nuclear technologies, electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles, lightweight composites in the automotive industry, natural-gas fueled trucks, bioenergy, pollution-control equipment, smart grids, combined heat and power, high-performance buildings, more efficient industrial technologies and power reliability.

“I think health care and advanced energy are both very important drivers for the state economy and employment,” says Matt Kisber, president and CEO of Silicon Ranch Corp., and TAEBC president. “Advanced energy accounts for nearly 14 percent of total state employment and those working in the sector earn an average wage of $59,665, significantly higher than the state’s economy-wide average of $44,317.”

Read more here.

Powering new growth: Advanced energy sector grows in Tennessee

(Originally published: Chattanooga Times Free Press)

In the 20th century, the Tennessee Valley Authority helped harness the power of the Tennessee River and Oak Ridge National Laboratory propelled America’s “atoms for peace” program by helping give birth to nuclear power.

As new forms of energy gain favor in the 21st century, Tennessee remains a powerful force in developing and building new means of energy production and use, ranging from solar and wind power to electric cars and energy-efficient buildings and appliances, according to a new study of the advanced energy business in Tennessee.

Although energy consumption is slowing and jobs in traditional energy utilities are declining with new efficiency measures, those losses are more than offset by the growth in other energy sectors. Indeed, an economic study by the University of Tennessee found that advanced energy industry jobs are growing faster than Tennessee’s overall economy and have created nearly 360,000 jobs, most of which pay above-average salaries.

UT researchers estimate that around the globe advanced energy is a $1.4 trillion industry, including any technology that makes energy or transportation cleaner, safer, more secure and more efficient. That’s almost twice the size of the global airline industry and nearly equal to worldwide apparel revenue.

In Tennessee, advanced energy includes solar, wind and new nuclear and gas technologies along with electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles, lightweight composites in the automotive industry, natural-gas fueled trucks, bioenergy, pollution-control equipment, smart grids, combined heat and power, high-performance buildings, more efficient industrial technologies, and power reliability.

Read more here.