A Public Forum: Electric Mass Transit as an Option for Urban Mobility

SAVE THE DATE:

A Public Forum

Electric Mass Transit as an Option for Urban Mobility

 

Presented by

University of Tennessee (UT) Howard H. Baker Center for Public Policy
Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation (TDEC)
Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

When: June 20-21, 2018

Where: Toyota Auditorium

Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy, Ut Knoxville

1640 Cumberland Avenue – Knoxville, Tennessee

With the emergence of electrified transit options and intelligent transportation system technologies, what are the costs, benefits, and barriers associated with these technologies that local governments, utilities, and transit agencies must consider and address? What best practices can be identified from electric mass transit and smart mobility case studies, and what can be done at the local, state, and federal levels to provide forward momentum in these areas? Are the visions of future transportation systems realistic and obtainable?

Join us for panel discussions regarding electric mass transit as an option for urban mobility on June 20-21, 2018. Our panelists will present on a variety of topics, including:

  • Technology and Connectivity
  • Policy Options and Issues
  • Smart Mobility Case Studies
  • Visions and Groundtruthing

This event is free, and lunch will be provided on both days. An evening networking reception will also be planned.

Register here!

This event is sponsored by UT, TDEC, and TVA. If you have any questions, please contact TDEC OEP’s Communications Coordinator Shauna Basques at Shauna.Basques@tn.gov or 615-253-1947.

TAEBC hosts lunch & learn with TVA’s newest board member Jeff Smith

TAEBC members had the opportunity to have an open dialogue with the newest addition to TVA’s board, Jeff Smith.

Smith was nominated by President Donald Trump on Sept. 21, 2017, and was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on Dec. 21, 2017. He was sworn in by U.S. District Judge Pamela L. Reeves of the Eastern District of Tennessee.

Director Smith lives in Knoxville and serves as the Executive Vice President of Operations for UT-Battelle and the Deputy for Operations at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

During the meeting, Smith discussed his leadership style was something that was passed down to him from his father by leaving things in a better condition then when you found it.

He also elaborated how when it comes to economic development, TVA has been working to recruit companies to the area by making things more simplistic. He mentioned several conversations have taken place at TVA as the energy company sees more industries moving to the area, they are brainstorming ways TVA can be involved in the process.

Jeff also seemed open to more focus groups and interactions with stakeholders that include pilot or demonstration projects with TAEBC members.

TVA hosting IRP 2019 Quarterly Webinar

TVA is hosting its first Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) Quarterly Public Update Meeting on May 15, 2018. The webinar will run from 11 to 11:45 a.m. EDT, and participants will need to register here.

The 2019 IRP is a comprehensive study that provides direction on how to best meet future electricity demand. Learn more about the IRP on TVA’s IRP website.

IRP quarterly webinars are designed to ensure continued transparency, information-sharing and public engagement around the development of the 2019 IRP. TVA held a scoping webinar at the kickoff of the 2019 IRP.

At the May 15 webinar, TVA will:

  • Introduce the 2019 IRP – What it is, why TVA is doing it and how it will help determine the Valley’s energy future,
  • Provide an update on where TVA is in the developing process,
  • Summarize public scoping comments,
  • Review next steps.

If interested, please be sure to register.

TVA board approves rate structure change, imposing new fixed fee

(Credit: Knoxville News Sentinel)

The TVA board voted unanimously Thursday to change its rate structure, cutting its wholesale power rate by a half-cent per kilowatt-hour, and imposing a half-cent fixed fee per kilowatt-hour instead.

TVA officials say the controversial move won’t bring in more money than the current billing system, but critics denounce it as shifting more costs from big industrial customers down onto rate-paying homeowners.

TVA board members are meeting in Florence, Alabama, on Thursday.

At a 90-minute morning “listening session,” members of the public, environmental and social groups, and power industry representatives gave mostly negative comments on the proposal.

Primary reasons were greater impact on the poorest ratepayers, and the assertion that a flat fee will discourage energy efficiency.

Read the full story here.

TAEBC submits comments to TVA over 2019 IRP

The Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council submitted the following comments to the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) regarding its 2019 Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) scoping.

To whom it may concern:

The Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council (TAEBC) is pleased to submit the following comments to the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) regarding its 2019 Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) scoping. 

TAEBC would like to reiterate our commitment to supporting TVA as it takes steps to proactively address the evolving utility marketplace. Our intent is to provide TVA with economic development data to inform the utility’s decision on how best to meet future electricity demands.

TAEBC champions advanced energy as an economic development and job creation strategy. We exist to foster the growth of Tennessee’s advanced energy technologies, companies and jobs. Advanced energy is technology neutral – anything that makes energy cleaner, safer, more secure or more efficient is in the tent. At its core, we look to energy innovation as an economic development opportunity.

We encourage TVA to examine the advanced energy industry and Tennessee’s leadership position within the industry as it considers its 2019 IRP. This is a growing and lucrative sector of our economy. States and regions that provide an attractive home for this industry – and its workforce – will be rewarded with jobs and capital investment.

For example, Tennessee’s advanced energy economy contributes $33 billion to our state’s GDP, employs nearly 325,000 people, includes more than 17,000 business entities and pays an average annual wage that exceeds the state average.[1]

Globally, advanced energy is a $1.4 trillion industry. That is almost twice the size of the global airline industry and nearly equal to worldwide apparel revenue.[2]

TAEBC encourages TVA to consider how its IRP might encourage or discourage economic development, capital investment and jobs in our region from the advanced energy sector. This includes companies that 1) are directly engaged in the advanced energy industry (i.e. manufacture advanced energy widgets), 2) deploy advanced energy technologies as part of a commitment to corporate sustainability and 3) provide professional services (i.e. installers, engineers, etc that locate operations and talent in the region to service regional customers).

TAEBC has seen Fortune 100 and Fortune 500 companies across the country and Tennessee commit to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, increase energy efficiency targets or establish sustainability goals.[3] To remain competitive at recruiting and retaining business and industry, the Valley must offer an attractive environment for these companies to meet their goals and deploy advanced energy technologies.

As an example, Amazon specifically mentions “sustainability” in its HQ2 FAQ page – noting the company’s commitment to deploy advanced energy technologies at its facilities. The state that is selected for Amazon’s HQ2 will be rewarded with a $5 billion construction project and as many as 50,000 high-paying jobs.[4]

According to a report from Ceres that examines data provided by Fortune 500 companies, the largest companies in the United States are steadily increasing their clean energy and energy efficiency efforts while improving their bottom lines – a trend that is having an important role in the decarbonization of the U.S. electric power sector in recent years.[5] From the report: 

“Overall, nearly half of the companies in the 2016 Fortune 500 have set targets to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG), improve energy efficiency, and/or increase renewable energy sourcing—up five percentage points from our last report in 2014.

The strongest efforts are among Fortune 100 companies, with 63 percent adopting or retaining goals. In addition to the steady overall increase, the report also shows strong improvement among the smallest 100 companies in the Fortune 500, with 44 percent of these setting goals in one or more categories, up 19 percentage points from 2013.”

We encourage TVA to use the IRP to increase technological innovation and investment in the Valley so that we may seize this opportunity and emerge on the winning end of this trend, rather than fall behind.

With these objectives in mind, we offer the following guidance for the IRP process:

●      Ensure there is a collaborative, public, open stakeholder process for developing the IRP.
●      Resource planning should include both TVA-built resources and procured third-party resources; as well as take into consideration customer-sited and demand-side management resources. Correctly valuing distributed energy resources (DERs) is critical to integrating the benefits they offer to both demand and supply side operators. Valuing a stack or system of DERs is a challenge that must be addressed as the net benefits may increase when certain technologies are used together.

 

Thank you for the opportunity to provide comments. TAEBC stands ready to assist TVA as it  becomes the energy company of the future.

Sincerely,

Cortney Piper

Vice President, TN Advanced Energy Business Council

606 W Main Street, Suite 250, Knoxville, TN 37902

P: 865-789-2669

Cc TAEBC Board of Directors

      Matt Kisber, President
      Steve Bares, Secretary

Tom Ballard, Immediate Past President
Jeff Kanel
Trish Starkey
Marc Gibson
Jim DeMouy
Mary Beth Hudson
Chris Bowles

[1] Tennessee Advanced Energy Economic Impact Report, TN Advanced Energy Business Council (2015). http://tnadvancedenergy.com/tennessee-advanced-energy-economic-impact-report/

[2] Advanced Energy Now, 2017 Market Report, Advanced Energy Economy (2018). http://info.aee.net/hubfs/PDF/AEN-2017-Market-Report.pdf

[3] More Companies Set 100% Renewable Energy Goals in 2017, Energy Manager Today (December 2017). https://www.energymanagertoday.com/100-renewable-energy-goals-2017-0173841/